Advertisements

Advertise with WomenHunters™ 
We offer the most cost-effective
 rates in the hunting industry.

Join as member

Click "join" at top
to become a member.
Be part of a womens hunting club
Support our website 
 
 

We have 71 guests and no members online

Club Member Info

 
Benefits of membership in WomenHunters™
 
A voice where you can submit an article about your hunt to be published.
 
Get a WomenHunters™ camo hat.
 
Get a WomenHunters™ decal.
 
Promote and have an ally in an organization that supports women who hunt.
 
Get in touch with your states' regional director about shoots in your area or support shoots yourself and become a regional director for your state. Free WomenHunters™ patch and chevron included!
 
Support a womens website with archived articles that are about women hunting by women hunters.
 
Get 20% off any advertisement for your business.
 
 
 
 
Contact
membership coordinator:

Members:

Would you like to be
a Regional Director
for your state?

Email
kathleen@womenhunters.com
for more info
 
 

Statistics

Articles View Hits
17991852

Writing for Women Hunters

One of the benefits of membership in the WH club is that WH will publish your best hunting stories and tips. 

Please submit your story or article to Kathleen today, and remember to attach your photos!

Submit story

Get writing help

Join WH

 

Bear Signs

By Kathleen Kalina

All photos by Kathleen Kalina.

This is an excellent example of a bear rub. Hair was found attached to the bark of this aspen, so the rubbing occurred recently. You can bet that this an area that the bear favors, he is leaving his marks and scent on the trees as well as scratching his back.  He will be back. St Louis County, MN.

This is a spring-time (June) bear scat, probably a month or so old. It's the color of digested grasses and bark. It was found near berry bushes, so he will be back for the berries, he's marking and checking his territory. St Louis County, MN.

A bear has scratched the side of this hill to get the ants and other bugs out.  He spent awhile here.

Bear scat with undigested berries. He was full and eating well. St Louis County MN.

Back paw prints with more weight on right paw. He stood up to see what was ahead.

Front paws and back paws are clearly visible. After standing the bear tapped his front paws near his back and then a bounding set of front tracks up further. These are very clear and unusually good tracks in wet sand. (Pickle lake Ontario). Very recent and probably less than a half hour old. Sand will start to crumble as sun dries it.

This was the bear that made the clear sand tracks. He was not far off and had been sitting in sand resting, until he spotted me.  Notice how his lip is curled showing the irritation of having been disturbed. He made a "woofing" noise, but nevertheless retreated. He's an old bear which is obvious by his size and weight.  Old male bears can often be very disagreeable, so they shouldn't be messed with. (what was I thinking?).

Another big bear at Pickle Lake, Ontario. He's huffing and lip curling.  Don't mess with this bear. He is squinting, not from sun, but so that he can see better what I am doing. Bears can see almost as good as humans. But I was carrying a telephoto lens on my camera and he's trying to figure out what that is. Bears are curious, but smarter than most people think. They can distinguish items that you are carrying.  (Is it food, is it a gun? Just what is she carrying?).

On hot days, bears search for berries along the roadside rather than deal with thick vegetation accompaning bugs.  In remote Ontario, it's common to see a bear taking a walk on side of the road. 

Women Hunters Hat

Buy WomenHunters Hat $15

wh-emb-camo-cap

Books By Members

Books By WomenHunters
 
By Kathleen Kalina
Amazon Kindle and Ipad
 
By Kathleen Kalina
 
By Christine Cunningham

Regional Directors

 
Regional Directors organize
and participate in
get-togethers,
shoots and shows

Julia Heinz
Alaska and the Yukon
juliah@womenhunters.com

Kathy Russell
Missouri
kathyr@womenhunters.com

Tammy Hartline
North Alabama, Mississippi p
and North Georgia
tammyh@womenhunters.com

Synthia Wilson
Kansas
synthia@womenhunters.com

Kim Hose
Maryland
 
Rachel Baker
    Colorado    
 
Beth Milligan
Arkansas
 
Jo Rice
Washington
 
Angelina Coopersmith
Michigan
 
Jenny Paul
Texas
 
 
 Mara Osborne
North Carolina
 

 

Tracy Rowe
Illinois

 

 

 

 To become a regional director
for your area, contact:
kathleen@womenhunters.com